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is the assistant attorney general of the civil rights division in washington, dc, he was nominated for that position by president obama and sworn in in october of 2009 and we are all the lucky -- we are all very lucky that that happened in october of 2009. tom has spent his entire career in public service and on protecting the civil rights of our most vulnerable people. tom actually joined the civil rights division as a young lawyer and while he was there he prosecuted some of the most significant cases in the country. lawyers in the civil rights division get fanned out to places in the country to handle cases in mississippi and alabama and california and all over and tom was one of those people. he was sent to texas to handle a very significant hate crime case when he was a young lawyer that involved a gang of white supremacists that went on a killing spree and ended up shooting 3 people and killing one when he was a young lawyer working in the civil rights division. he later served as a top deputy for attorney general janet reno, he was special counsel to ted kennedy and ser
and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being here. as i said, we're grailsd with th
and selma, stonewall. the milestones of the women's rights movement and the civil rights movement and the gay rights movement. and that was a great, a great speech for reminding us how important it is that we stand on the shoulders of these great people who came before us, and who have turned radical ideas to commonsense ideas, and expanded our democracy and made our society more democratic. but one of the things i noticed in the speech and you probably noticed it yourself was that there was something missing in that litany of great moments, great milestones of progressive history, seneca falls, selma and stonewall. and that was really nothing about the labor movement and that speech. and i thought to myself, like, why not? and why was a later movement missing. and then i thought welcome maybe it's because there was no great milestones of the labor movement that begin with the letter s. i was trying to think if i was a speechwriter and is trying to inject the labor movement into the obama and niger speech, but what i have advised him? i was thinking that what are some of the great
, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, rus
convention this year was civil rights rapist bill clinton. [applause] the convention featured a tribute to teddy kennedy who has the only confirmed kill in the war on women. [applause] i half expected charles man son onshow up on night -- manson night three. some taxpayers don't want to pay for someone else's birth control. i think that haircut is birth ontrol enough. your average democrat believes crazyier than todd aiken but the democrats don't let their candidates open their mouths and stay stupid stuff. otherwise, you would have democrats saying that abortion shower funded federally, confiscate all guns. democrats tell their candidates open your mouth and we'll kill you. in addition to, being much better at stealing elections, democrats are much crueler to those who hurt the democratic party. they don't get book contracts or radio gigs or tv gigs for harming the democratic party. here is howard dean's tv show? if we focused on what is really causing problems, they are going to say that the problem with the republican party is the conservative principles. conservativism is the only t
in civil rights and anti-war protests and many of his subsequent writings reflects his experiences by stressing the importance of grassroots political activity in the african-american freedom struggle. his first book, end struggle snick and the black awakening of the 1960s remains a definitive history of student nonviolent coordinating committee, one of the most dynamic and innovative civil rights organizations of our time. he served as senior advisor for a 14-part award winning public television series on civil rights entitled "eyes on the prize." i know we all remember that. (applause) >> his recent, his recent publication, the book, martin's dream: my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr., a memoir about his transition from being a teenage participant in the march on washington to becoming a historian and an educator and, of course, if you sign up for a membership you can get that book today. it's here. in 1985 he was invited by coretta scott king to direct a long-term project to edit and publish the definitive multi-volume edition, the papers of martin luther kinder
to that. and it is about state leadership, not just looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point o
new report about the justice department's civil rights division suggesting deep hostile divisions when it comes to the idea of enforcing the voting rights laws equally, whether the defendant in the case is black or white. whether the victim in the case is black or white. that's coming up. and a rape case that's divided a town and captured the country's attention. the two suspects are members of a high school football team, the team is the star of the town, it's what people do in steubenville, ohio and the entire incident coming to light after a video was posted online in which someone on the team seemed to be mocking a girl who he thought appeared dead. she was not dead, thankfully, but she is said to be the victim after rape and these are the two boys who say they're innocent of that alleged sexual assault. kelly's court takes a look at the case. [ kate ] many women may not be absorbing the calcium they take as well as they could because they don't take it with food. switch to citracal maximum plus d. it's the only calcium supplement that can be taken with or without food. my doctor r
summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's will send you a
for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introduction -- no, i get to say something. i get to say something. as everyone in this room knows, youngest mayor in 100 years, right? youngest mayor in 100 years when he was elected 10 years ago and he has remained an effective and visionary leader for everyone. mayor newsom gained worldwide recognition when he granted marriage licenses to same sex couples in 2004. we all remember those moving pictures of smiling couples on the steps of city hall, some of them their children watching on. his actions in 2004 thrust this civil rights issue into the national spotlight and cemented his reputation as a fearless public officials who does what he thinks is right. under mayor newsom's energetic leadership the economy grew and the city became an economic center for biotech and clean tech. gach newsom has been a trail blaitzer on combating homelessness and protecting the government. in 2007 he was re-elected as mayor with more than 70 percent of the vote, which is unheard of.
at the u.s. capitol and one block away we're considering getting rid of the pillar of american civil rights law and that happens at the same time at the same place and nobody's head explodes. i think the voting rights acted is really, really important. it's not so old that it seems like it doesn't aply. when i wanted to talk to somebody about it i talked to john lewis who was nearly killed on a bridge in selma less than a week before president johnson formed a session of congress to talk about what they did to the man in selma. john lewis is still in congress. there's no camera. we never get footage of what happens in there. it's weird to see antonin scalia in person. weird. >> jon: does he. i only read some of the transcripts of what he was saying. he was saying we've got to get rid of this because it's one of last invest yijs of racial preference. >> he said when congress reupped they looked into whether or not it was still necessary. ten months of debate, 21 hearings, 15,000 pages of evidence and in the senate they voted 98-0, yeah we still need but he said, yeah what does that vote mean
molfuss is a real person with a real record on civil rights. you may be thinking to yourself, couldn't you just look that up? yeah, we could have. or, or we could have remained smugly satisfied with the funny name. we went with b mainly because i am a made 12-year-old boy trapped in a 75-year-old man's body. so as it turns out dick molfuss -- don't get tickled by the name, johnny boy -- it turns out dick molfuss has a long and distinguished record of speaking out for civil rights in mississippi. he's an honorable and good man. who in the '90s led the charge on big voting rights reforms there. in 1989 he spoke at a 25th anniversary memorial for the three civil rights activists murdered outside philadelphia mississippi during the summer, a speech that earned mr. molpus death threats. apparently bitter racists live longer than you would think. anyway, we found out all this, i'd say, about a half hour after it aired on a thursday night i might add. not the best night for us to make a mistake. sincere apologies to mr. molpus. he did not ask us for apologize. no one contacted us to complain. my
together around this issue representing our civil rights, labor, and social justice and religious organizations as well as our diverse communities including leaders from our african-american, asian american, latino, lgbt and jewish communities. my second item is to call for a hearing around a potential sewage disaster. as supervisor yee well knows from district 7 two weeks ago, a pc water main broke in west polk which damages 23 homes on a residential block. over the past two years our city has had over 200 water main breaks and about as many burst water sewer lines and paid out claims and judgments in that period totaling over $5 million. in today's chronicle, and this is an article that is at the top of a bay area section of sf gate, the chronicle reported that the 8 washington [speaker not understood] project we considered last year is built as was currently planned could threaten our city's north force main, which is a sewer pipeline that carries one quarter of our city's sewage. serving the financial district, north beach, chinatown, the marina, and other northeast neighborho
afternoon. my name is rachel roberts and i am the civil rights coordinator for the council on american islamic relations san francisco bay area office. i would first of all like to thank you on behalf of our organization for supporting this important resolution and i would especially like to acknowledge the commitment and hard work of supervisor chiu and his wonderful staff. thank you. those of us who come from marginalized communities know that in tightxv of great fear and prejudice that it is not politically easy to stand with communities that are being scapegoated. today you have made it clear to the world that san francisco will not give in too bigtry. over the past 24 hours, we have heard from many members of the american muslim community. we are here to share their gratitude for your bravery and your commitment to diversity and inclusion. thank you. >> thank you. next speaker. >>> the greatest miscarriage of justice was when jesus was killed. and when they came to the place which is called calvary, there they crucified him and the malefactors, one on the right hand and one on the
. thomas e perez currently oversees the civil rights division and to no one's surprise he has a long history of controversy. and don't take my word for it. when he was floated as a potential pick, jay adams had this to say about his former colleague when he spoke "the great one" mark levin. >> tell us about this fellow perez before he went into the justice department. >> well, he's a radical's radical, used to be maryland, and worked with the-- he's an extreme radical, anti-business, a racialist to the core. >> can you imagine this man in charge of the labor department, the total leapt. >> totally lawless, this is a man for whom law is a nuisance. >> joining me now with the reaction from americans for justice, jay sekulow and congressman dennis kucinich. you didn't like when the black panthers were outside with the batons the polling place in philly, you didn't like that. >> that case didn't have anything to do with secretary designate perez. >> actually, it did. the issue came up with the new black panther case in which the inspector general reviewed the case and supported the accus
became involved in civil rights movement to protect housing discrimination after a local real estate office refused to work with him because he was black. then there were a very significant first. first african american elected to san francisco in the california state assembly. the first african american speaker of the california state assembly. and as we all know the first african mayor of san francisco [ applause ] >> first, the first, the first. and a speaker of the assembly he would also become the first and the only politicians to hold that position for 15 years. longer than any other individual so much so that a new paradigm was created with prop 140 which instituted term limits. had that not happened and all likelihood, willie brown might still be speaker had he so desired the. [ [ applause ] >> it's worth noting that willie became speaker of the state assembly after the coalition of republican and democrats. 28 republicans, 23 democrats. some say this goes back to a period of more consilt tree and less contentious part of american policies. i would a tend that it's his way to
of sister rosa parks and commemorating the modern civil rights leader for her courageous and declaring -- for her courageousness and declaring february 4th rosa parks day in san francisco. (applause) >> i thought you might like that. i'm done. thank you. [laughter] >> thank you. supervisor. and now there are a couple other people, sheriff mirkarimi has joined us. [speaker not understood] is in the room with us as well. reverend amos brown is with us. welcome. (applause) >> now supervisor breed will bring us brief remarks. >> hi, everybody. (applause) >> so happy to see all your smiling faces in the audience. happy black history month. i bring you greetings on behalf of district 5 in our great city. thank you, mr. mayor, for opening up city hall to my colleague, supervisor cohen, and my distinguished colleagues sitting here in the front row on the board of supervisors. it's truly an honor to stand before you on such a great month. recent -- yesterday congresswoman barbara lee talked about dr. martin luther king and his dream and some of the issues that we were dealing with over 40 years
leads the doj's civil rights division and could wind up being the next u.s. labor secretary. a cabinet member who will play a key role in the the president's efforts to raise the minimum wage and reform immigration laws among many other responsibilities, but with at least one former doj attorney describing mr. perez as a quote, radical radical who views the law as, quote, a nuisance, you can bet there's a fight over this man's nomination may get intense. chris stirewalt is our fox news digital power editor on power play.com live. tom perez's tenure heading up to the doj has been controversial to say the least, but he is beloved by those on the left as someone who embodies virtually all the principles they stand for. what does it say that president obama is proceeding with that nomination despite some of the controversies that emerged when he they floated the trial balloon earlier? >> well, in washington we can tell a lot more about somebody's intent by what they do than what they say. what we've heard a lot said of the white house of late is that they're interested in reaching out to r
. thanks, steve! [laughter] nation, no one is a bigger fan of the civil rights movement than yours truly. i even attended 1963's historic march on washington-- and this is true-- while still in my mother's womb. [laughter] i'll never forget martin luther king's stirring words. [heartbeat sounds] [muffled voice] [laughter] that's why i'm personally invested in a challenge to the 1965 voting rights act now before the supreme court. that's right. the law that banned the silencing of african americans is finally coming before our nation's foremost silent african-american. [laughter] of course, before the voting rights act black people were regularly kept from voting with roadblocks like literacy tests, poll taxes, and "you must be this white to vote" signs. [laughter] now that law is being challenged in the supreme court by shelby county, alabama. they argue that the law is unfair, because it applies only to states with histories of racial discrimination: alabama, arizona, georgia, louisiana, mississippi, south carolina, texas, parts of carolina, texas, virginia, and alaska, which has a sad his
polarization within the doj civil-rights unit. my next guest works at the doj before he resigned in 2010 over the department's dismissal of a new black panther party boater intimidation case. joining us now, former u.s. to pardon of justice attorney, author of the book in justice exposing the racial agenda of the obama justice department. good to have you with us. >> good to be here. lou: you have to feel vindicated by the doj inspector general's report. let's just share the findings. let me be clear, you have said that peres had provided false testimony. the ig report concludes and are we found the testimony did not reflect the entire story regarding the involvement of political appointees. we did not find press intentionally misled the commission. nevertheless, given he was testifying as an apartment witness before the commission we believe he should have some more details. your reaction? >> look. this is what we have been saying for years about this civil rights division. it has enormous power over business. call that a rat's nest. invested with racial animus. an inspector general report d
of labor. he comes directly from the department of justice where he's the head of the civil rights division, the division responsible for enforcing federal discrimination statutes. white house officials point to the fact that he helped settle the three largest fair lending cases in the department history as some of the reasons why he should be the head over at labor. however, republicans are pointing to a report issued by the department of justice's i.g. last week, the inspector general that basically said that division that perez leads is still in two camps. they're examples of harassment, inappropriate personnel attacks and the i.g.'s report basically found all those issues predate president obama's tenure in office. however, they really haven't been addressed to the satisfaction of the i.g., inspector general, thus far. mr. perez says he's worked with the department, that there have been improvements since he's taken office there but a number of republicans are pointing to this, especially senator grassley saying that mr. perez is woefully unprepared to answer questions about this. remem
, and then it was not until much later that i figured that i was a civil rights lawyer because i think that the work of public defenders is the work of civil rights, fighting for the rights, and given the disperties in the criminal justice system, the race is not really that far from what i thought my original dream was. >> host: where did you go to law school? >> guest: i went to harvard law school and howard university undergrad. >> host: you have a famous name. >> guest: i do. terrorist confusing -- it's confusing to people. i get phone calls and e-mails from people. i got communications from cuba. that's why i knew they -- an incredible woman who i admire greatly -- >> host: have you met her? >> guest: i have not. i want to meet her. i got a lot of e-mails and, you know, so i had that kind of communication with her, and, you know, she's doing a lot of important work talking about the prison industrial complex and the criminal justice system, but it created more confusion. >> host: we have been talking here at american university with professor angela j. davis, "arbitrary" justice, the name of the book, th
series on civil rights continues with filmmaker, keith beauchamp. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ >> michael: a federal judge began hearing testimony today to determine if policemen have been stopping people unconstitutionally. defenders of the program state has brought down gun violence but they say at its core it is racial profiling that violates the constitution. joining me now is keith beauchamp, keith direct theed the documentary "the untold story of emmett louis till" and hosts the "the injustice files: hood of suspicion" which examines contemporary cases of racial profiling. keith welcome to "the war room." >> thank you for having me. >> michael: keith, new york saw 419 murders last year. the lowest numbers since record keeping began in the 1960s, so is this a small price to pay for a safer community? >> i think it causes a bigger problem. you are talk about statistically if you look at these cases out of 1 in 1,000 cases of those stops, you have actual gun violations. when you take a look at the percentage of those being stopped, out of 90% there are no arrest o
at the forefront of the discussion. many see them as the civil rights issues of our time. we must be a party that is welcoming and inconclusive for all voters. sean, put ago side how candidates look, does that mean you'll look for candidates that are more accepting for things like same-sex marriage? >> no, what it means and this is something that ronald reagan said in practice, which means my 80% sfrend not my 20% enemy. the principles are sound. is this not a question of how do we change the party or the principles. what it is, it's saying we as a party, if we want to grow and we want to win and govern again, at the presidential level, we've got to look at times and said, hey, you may not agree eye us on every single issue that the party has put out there, but we're willing to include you in the party as long as you understand. >> doesn't this conflict with some of the messaging we've heard from cpac over the weekend, though? >> there are personal some speakers at cpac who don't believe otherwise. i would argue while cpac does represent a good amount of people that believe in the republican
and identify theft and hate crimes and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places
amos brown to present the plaque to mayor brown's unwavering commitment to civil rights. [ applause ] >> thank you richard brown. it's good to see you and thank you dr. parkel. that's all i got. i could listen to him talk all day. that was fantastic. >> christina, would you like to come up again? >> thank you. we have a few special thank yous that we want to wrap the ceremony up with. if vernal, elsie and deanna if you can please come up. we would really appreciate it. and so behalf on the mayor's office we would like to say thank you deeply for your contribution for making these services such a success. >> thank you. >> they are beautiful. >> for you. we have certificates of honor on behalf of the mayor's services. we are good at making certificates of honor. >> thank you. >> okay. and thank you to everybody for your contribution, your time and commitment to showing up today. the sponsors, we appreciate your support. now that concludes our ceremony. please enjoy the reception. thank you. >> there are kids and families ever were. it is really an extraordinary playground. it has got
a yes vote. >> rest in peace. this is an important they that we have been fighting for. >> many civil-rights activists are calling for a no vote. they say it does not sufficiently limit his powers. >> the draft being put together says it more authority vests with the president. >> the referendum results are expected within five days. it will be months before gesture political impact can accurately be assessed. >> we will take a look at the latest bundesleague action in a moment, but here's a look at what else is making news. the united states has announced plans to bolster missile defense and alaska by the end of 2017. washington is cancelling part of the european missile defense plan. defense secretary chou cables as the changes reflect -- chuck hagel says it reflects threats from south korea. french tourists have been in gang raped in india. a woman was camping with her husband went men wielding sticks attack the couple. this come three months after a 23-year-old girl was gang raped in delhi in a case that sparked international outrage. the defending champions, dortmund, came from behind t
this year was civil rights rapist bill clinton. [applause] the convention featured a tribute to teddy kennedy who has the only confirmed kill in the war on women. [applause] mansonexpected charles to show up on night three. some taxpayers don't want to pay for someone else's birth control. i think that haircut is birth control enough. your average democrat believes crazier than todd aiken but the democrats don't let their candidates open their mouths and stay stupid stuff. otherwise, you would have democrats saying that abortion shower funded federally, confiscate all guns. democrats tell their candidates open your mouth and we'll kill you. muchdition to, being better at stealing elections, democrats are much crueler to those who hurt the democratic party. they don't get book contracts or radio gigs or tv gigs for harming the democratic party. where is howard dean's tv show? if we focused on what is really causing problems, they are to say that the problem republican party is the conservative principles. conservativism is the only thing that the republicans have going for them. [appla
that if we did we would be treated okayed liked that and wanted to be a civil rights lawyer that that's what i wanted to do from the time i was 6-years-old, i'm sorry, the sixth grade. and i knew i was going to law school and by the time i went, i got interested in criminal law. before that i never thought of, wall and my professor made of the class interesting and i thought of pursuing that and i ended up that wasn't so much later on a think that the work of public defenders we are fighting some civil rights of our clients and given the disparity of the criminal-justice system, the racial disparity. i went to harvard law school and howard university undergrad. you have a very famous name. a few times i've gotten invitations from cuba but she is an incredible wollman myett meijer triet >> host: you met her? >> guest: i've never met her. i want to meet her. i get a lot of e-mails and that kind of communication with her. she now is doing a lot of important work on the present industrial contact creates more confusion >> host: we have been talking with defense the power of the american prosecut
will nominate thomas harris as the new labor secretary. he heads the justice department civil rights division. he faced criticism for giving misleading testimony to the u.s. mission on civil rights. he would replace hilda sill lease. instead of eating while you were distracted you are consuming more calories. people who eat meals or snacks watching tv playing games or reading tend to eat more. >> i do believe that study. >> the u.s. postal service is $16 billion in debt and stopping saturday delivery to stay athroat they say. you wouldn't know it by the way the agency is spending millions to send workers to a lavish conference in california and it is happening this week. we have an inside look at the event. >> here at the annual postal forum executives will meet with thousands of shippers and those in the direct mail industry. and then everyone gets to have a good time in stan fran. there's a guolf outing dance an food from the fisherman's wharf and chinatowchinatown. the travel exhibit space and other incidentals will cost the postal service $2.2 million lass. the agency receives no tax doll
of the civil rights division at the justice department the president also marked women's history month today, but talking about the long fight for equal rights. >> 100 years ago this month, thousands of women were marching right outside this house, demanding one of our most fundamental rights, the right to vote. a century later. its rooms are full of accomplished well who have overcome discrimination, shattered glass ceilings, and become outstanding role models for all of our sons and daughters. all of you inspire me to make sure that i'm doing everything that i can as president to carry on that progress. >>> and he keeps that promise. less than two weeks ago the president signed the new violence against women act into law, part of a broad progressive push we have seen in this second term. a kyle senate panel is said to be close to a deal on immigration. unemployment is down to 7.7%, the lowest level in four years. since the gop's big loss, republicans have spent a lot of times looking backwards, but the president is moving the country ahead. joining me now is victoria defran chez ko soto, a
. the supremes are hearing arguments on a new law that civil rights advocates. it is getting hot in the court and in the spin. it is a book that says take me with you. when did you know that grandma was the one? when her sister dumped me. grandpa was my dad a good athlete? no. oh dad, you remember my friend alex? yeah. the one that had the work done... good to see you. where do we go when we die? the ground. who's your girlfriend? his name is chad. and that's where babies come from. [ male announcer ] sometimes being too transparent can be a bad thing. this looks good! [ male announcer ] but not with the oscar mayer deli fresh clear pack. it's what you see is what you get food. it's oscar mayer. it's what you see is what you get food. guten tag. greetings earthlings. how you doin'? hola. sup. yello. howdy. what's crackalackin? it is great we express ourselves differently. if we were all the same, life would be boring. so get to know people who aren't like you. you'll appreciate what makes us different. the more you know. >>> the supreme court heard arguments today in a dispute over arizona's
with controversy. perez currently oversees the civil rights division, and under his division, challenged voting laws and opponents say it restricts minority voting. that's not all, learning a new report released by the department inspector general, the lawsuit against the new black panther party back in 2008. joining me now to explore more on this possible pick. is syndicated columnist, michelle malkin. welcome back. >> thanks for having me on, sean. >> sean: and the radical people keep getting through and i would expect him to take his ideological comrades. >> this is completely expected of course and i think the ball is now in the court of the republican party to expose just how radical this assistant attorney general is and i've reported extensively on tom perez's history as an extremist, race-baiter, and i think most troubling from my perspective, his long-time advocacy, not of american workers, but of illegal alien workers. this is somebody who cut his teeth at casa de maryland which is one of the most activist open border groups in the country. it's funded by government. millions of dolla
the inspector general's report, basically misleading the commission on civil rights about the lawsuit, it relates to the new black panther party back in 2008, those were the guys standing outside the polling place in philly banging on batons and wearing military gear, as we're putting up on the screen here. why don't you explain that. >> yes, just to set the context, remember that these thugs were harassing not only people who were voting at that philadelphia precinct in the fall of 2008, but also harassing and hurling poisonous racial epithets and demagoguery and people trying to monitor the voting booth there. it's thanks to brave whistle blowers within the goj, christopher adams and christopher coates the head of the rights section and who blue the whistle, and the monkeying around by many of the appointees, the polittization, and even under the administration, they had agreed that these people were culpable for violating voting rights laws. >> sean: he also refused to honor the subpoenas. thinking the position he has, he has a obligatin obligation t what is asked of him, especiall
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